Posted in Book & Movie Reviews

Book Review: How to Be Married by Jo Piazza

HowToBeMarriedPic

Title: How to Be Married- What I Learned from Real Women on Five Continents About Surviving My First (Really Hard) Year of Marriage

Author: Jo Piazza

Genre: Non-fiction

Publisher: Harmony Books

Pages: 276

REVIEW

In my humble opinion, Jo Piazza’s book, “How to Be Married” is a good read but not the type of book that’s hard to put down.  The book is well-written, funny, informative and honest but I had to read the book a couple chapters at a time.  Off and on, I was tempted to find another book to read. It could be that this is really the kind of book that would better keep my attention if I was listening to it on Audible while I was cooking or cleaning the house.  It may not be the same for you.

I really liked her journalistic approach to warming up to the idea of marriage, learning strategies to deal with disagreements and also finding solutions to working together as a team. She really put a lot of heart into learning how to have a successful marriage which was really endearing. My favorite advice was from a Chilean couple who were approaching their fortieth year of marriage. When she asked what made their marriage so successful, the wife replied, “We dance together every week. We’ve been dancing for forty years. When we dance, we become one. He sees me and I see him.  Everything I know about him, I learned while dancing.” (pg. 19) I instantly thought this was great advice.  Doing something together once a week that both people enjoy, which forces you to really see the other person and have fun is so important.  There are plenty of examples such as this to store away for future use.

What lost me was all the history and culture relayed about each country she traveled to. It just felt like too much and it would end up losing my attention.  In some cases, a little explanation of the customs which helped make their marriages successful was needed but in other instances, I would have preferred fewer details. When Piazza shared her private thoughts about which advice she should try to apply to her marriage and to what degree, showing that at times she was conflicted about how the women chose to live, I felt this was easier to relate to as I could see myself also feeling conflicted. I also liked her openness to changing her perspectives and being flexible to compromise as well as letting go of some of her pride in order to show love to her husband in the ways that were important to him. In conclusion, I feel that the book would have flowed better with less on an anthropology lesson.

Though this isn’t the type of book I would read more than once, I do plan on keeping it to refer to.

I give this book a 3.5/5.

I received this book from bloggingforbooks.com.